Our work focuses on using object manipulation to create temporary works of art in the form of sand paintings and kinetic sculptures.    For us, juggling is a state of arrested decay: a pattern woven through time and space that is constantly falling apart only to be rebuilt in the same moment.  Our performances create giant sand mandalas using innovative juggling props filled with sand.  The sand slowly spills out, creating an ethereal environment where every throw becomes a line, and every catch is splash of color.   Juggling props are thrown and combined to create kinetic sculptures that seem to defy physics.  The performances culminate in a short period of time for people to view the completed work of art and its destruction.  

 

Galen Harp

Galen grew up in a small town in Northwest Arkansas.  Even as a kid, he had a fascination with manipulating objects, whether it was action figures or pik-up stiks.  After graduating high school he moved to Fayetteville, AR, to attend college at University of Arkansas.  He learned to juggle from  his father-in-law, Joel Henderson, in 2000.  Once he actually learned how to juggle, he took to it immediately, often spending more than eight hours a day practicing.  He spends his time hanging out with his wife Jennifer and his daughter Gretchen, who is already attempting to make objects jump through hoops.

 

 

 


 

 Ellen Winters

 Ellen grew up in Davenport, IA, where she learned to juggle at age ten. The summer before college, Ellen moved to Iowa City and started busking.  Through busking she met other jugglers.  Ellen was completely hooked.  While attending Carleton College, she joined the Carleton Juggling F.I.S.H., and soon discovered the joy of juggling festivals at Madfest 2000. In 2005 Ellen graduated with a B.A. in History, and in 2006 she moved to Fayetteville, AR where she met her husband, Mike Johnston.